Are New Tires on Your Back to School List?

August 3rd, 2016

by: Cody Wallis

 

 

Fall is in the air, and that can mean only one thing: it’s back to school time! As you run through your back to school checklist- pencils, notebooks, binders, books, and tires- yes, you read that correctly: TIRES. Why add new tires to your back to school checklist? Because now is the BEST time to get new tires for you or your student’s vehicle. Whether you are carpooling your students around, want something dependable for your extra-curricular high school smarty, or need that reliable vehicle for your independent college bound kid- making sure you get the ...[more]

  Posted in: Tire 101

Are All-Season Tires Really All-Season?

October 30th, 2015
We frequently get questions about all-season tires when consumers are trying to make the right purchasing decision for  a set of new tires. As the title of the blog asks…”are all-season tires really all-season?”
 
The answer is: it that depends on what part of the country you’re living in.
 
All-season tires are a compromise from the very start. They’re designed for a forgiving ride, low noise, decent handling and good road manners. Maybe not as much as what a good set of grand touring tires can deliver, but pretty respectable…and also with an aggressive tread pattern which 
...[more]
  Posted in: Tire 101

Winter Tires? Or All-Season Tires?

October 10th, 2014
Winter tires versus all-season tires…which is the right choice for you?
 
The two designs are quite different and deliver different levels of performance and winter-weather traction, so let’s discuss. 
All-season tires are designed as an all-around compromise. They feature a tread pattern that evacuates water from the tire’s contact patch to prevent hydroplaning, with plenty of small, textured slits (sipes) to add extra biting edges for traction in wet or slushy conditions. 
...[more]
  Posted in: Tire 101

Determining the Age of a Tire

August 1st, 2014
by: Cody Wallis
 
 
When it comes to determining the age of a tire, it is easiest to identify when the tire was manufactured by reading its Tire Identification Number (often referred to as the tire’s serial number or DOT number). Unlike vehicle identification numbers (VINs) and the serial numbers used on many other consumer goods (which identify one specific item), Tire Identification Numbers are really batch codes that identify several components.
 
 
The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requires that Tire Identification Numbers be a combination ...[more]
  Posted in: Tire 101

Do Your Homework on Tire Safety

May 31st, 2014
We see it all the time…people tend to not think about their tires until something goes wrong. Sometimes, this can mean sitting on the side of the road waiting for help, and other times it can mean more serious consequences. Here are a few things to remember for tire safety as the summer winds down and back-to-school season starts.

Check your tire pressure regularly. This one is really important. Your car’s tires will lose air through the valve over time, and an underinflated tire will hurt fuel economy due to added rolling resistance. Low tires also affect handling and will generate enough heat that they can shor ...[more]
  Posted in: Tire 101

Is it Time for New Tires?

January 11th, 2014
Your tires are the only part of your vehicle that come into physical contact with the road, making proper tire maintenance a crucial element of driver safety. With the ability to stop, start, and transport us wherever we wish to go, having well-maintained tires can mean the difference between a pleasant Sunday drive and a Sunday spent in the shop. There are three crucial components to consider when deciding if it is time to replace your tires: your normal driving conditions, tread wear, and the age of your tires.
 
Weather conditions can be a major effect on the longevity of any tire. Tires used in more strenuous environments, such as areas with extreme temperature changes, can wear down much faster than tires used in more neutral ...[more]
  Posted in: Tire 101